Amber Vereecke

nprglobalhealth:

It’s All About The Girls: Is The World Listening To Them?
"My shoes wear out from walking to school, and then I can’t go because we can’t afford new shoes," says a girl from Indonesia.
"I want to live freely," says another girl, in Egypt. "I don’t want people to dictate what I do. No one to control us, no one to hit us, no one to tell us what clothes to wear."
In Congo, a girl starts to list her chores: “Tidying the house, fetching water, preparing meals,” she says. “There are so many I can’t even name them all.”
Their voices are part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, from 14 developing countries. They’ve shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation.
The aim: to change the way the world thinks about girls, says Lyric Thompson at the International Center for Research on Women, which worked with Nike on the project.
Writing this week in the journal Science, Melinda Gates says that “no society can achieve its potential with half of its population marginalized and disempowered.”
They are the “engines” of global development, writes the co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. And they should be at the center of development plans and goals.
Continue reading and see more photos.
Photo: "I want to grow up and become a police. But I need to study in a good school for that. I want to become a police to protect the country." - Fiza, 13, India (Courtesy of Nike Foundation)

nprglobalhealth:

It’s All About The Girls: Is The World Listening To Them?

"My shoes wear out from walking to school, and then I can’t go because we can’t afford new shoes," says a girl from Indonesia.

"I want to live freely," says another girl, in Egypt. "I don’t want people to dictate what I do. No one to control us, no one to hit us, no one to tell us what clothes to wear."

In Congo, a girl starts to list her chores: “Tidying the house, fetching water, preparing meals,” she says. “There are so many I can’t even name them all.”

Their voices are part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, from 14 developing countries. They’ve shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation.

The aim: to change the way the world thinks about girls, says Lyric Thompson at the International Center for Research on Women, which worked with Nike on the project.

Writing this week in the journal Science, Melinda Gates says that “no society can achieve its potential with half of its population marginalized and disempowered.”

They are the “engines” of global development, writes the co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. And they should be at the center of development plans and goals.

Continue reading and see more photos.

Photo: "I want to grow up and become a police. But I need to study in a good school for that. I want to become a police to protect the country." - Fiza, 13, India (Courtesy of Nike Foundation)

(via npr)

peteramend:

'Hiking' through the Narrows, Zion National Park. 16 miles of bliss.


I NEED to be there!!

peteramend:

'Hiking' through the Narrows, Zion National Park. 16 miles of bliss.

I NEED to be there!!

(via womaninthewoods)

mabtv3:

Love this. Such a simple statement made me so teary.

mabtv3:

Love this. Such a simple statement made me so teary.

(via pbsparents)

tepitome:

Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America 

(via bythenorthstar)

“All that we call human history — money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, classes, empires, slavery — is the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy”
— C. S. Lewis (via dailydoseofstuf)

(via onceuponawildflower)

Young men from Omo Valley, Ethiopia.

(Source: changdiaz, via bythenorthstar)

npr:

Before I went to Ferguson, Mo., to cover the aftermath of the Michael Brown shooting, a friend who had already been there reporting joked that he was certain that every person in the town had already been interviewed. And sure enough, the media crunch on was intense on West Florissant, the main boulevard that was the site of protests and clashes with the police in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown.

During the middle of the workday, it sometimes seemed like there was a 1:1 ratio between protesters and members of the press. The demonstrators typically wouldn’t come out in full force until the day went on; folks were either at work or waiting out the brutal humidity. Later at night, the people on West Florissant would get younger and rowdier, and it was those folks who were at the center of the skirmishes with the police we all saw on television and on social media.

But Ferguson isn’t a very large town. All those flash bangs and tear gas canisters were going off just behind people’s homes or in front of their small businesses. It’s your typical American suburb, and in many ways, it still was, even with all the clamor going on. Photographer Eric Kayne and I walked around the neighborhood chatting with people while they worked or relaxed, enjoying the last few weeks of summer, even as their town had become the most recent locus for Our Ongoing National Conversation on Race.

Scenes From The Ferguson We Didn’t See On TV

Photo credit: Eric Kayne for NPR